85°F
Sponsored by

Breaking Down Obamacare: The Basics

AROUND ARKANSAS -- The countdown to Obamacare is on. Starting October 1, health insurance exchanges through the Affordable Health Care Act will be open for business.
AROUND ARKANSAS -- The countdown to Obamacare is on. Starting October 1, health insurance exchanges through the Affordable Health Care Act will be open for business.

A recent pew poll shows people are reacting to that news with a big question mark. When asked how well they understood the law and its effects on their families, only 25-percent of Americans said they understood the effects very well, 39-percent said somewhat, and 21-percent polled "not too well."

Considering those numbers, Obamacare has a lot of people asking questions so we tracked down an expert and uncovered some answers.

"I try never to make it a political issue... We focus just on the care that's going to be available."

People can start signing up for the Affordable Health Care Act starting October 1 and it will go into effect January 1. The October date, however, is not a deadline. You can still sign up for the coverage afterward. For those who are not too familiar with the act, their main question is cost.

"I cannot find any ballpark figures even and I have done an extensive search because the network providers, I believe themselves, are trying to figure out, okay what are they going to charge, what are they going to charge," said Bettie Miller, an instructor at the University of Arkansas getting her Doctorate in Public Policy.

These networks are real insurance companies, several you have probably heard of, and together they create a marketplace.

"For the people who have insurance, they'll be able to either keep what they have, they can even look at the network and see if they can get a better deal,"

Those that are underinsured can choose to supplement their insurance through a network. Those that do not have insurance will not be forced to purchase insurance, but could pay a penalty down the road.

"After a period of years, they will look at what a reasonable penalty would be... Most people pay more for one doctor's visit than they would be paying a month for this insurance," said Miller.

During her studies, Miller has read the entire Affordable Health Care Act and is able to recognize potential flaws.

"It's not perfect, it's not, but hopefully we can make revisions as needed... Pre-existing conditions, people who could not possibly be insured could not buy insurance, now they can... A lot of people want peace of mind and choice and that's what this is providing,"

A helpful resource you can use, even if you are already covered, is healthcare.gov. It will steer you toward the marketplace in Arkansas.

Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus

More Local News