75°F
Sponsored by

Child Abuse Victim Speaks Out On Importance of Reporting

"I just felt very hopeless and very alone, and though I was only 5 years old, I didn't want to keep on living"

"I just felt very hopeless and very alone, and though I was only 5 years old, I didn't want to keep on living and it wasn't that I wanted to die, I just didn't want to keep on living like I was living in that situation," Cheryl Bramlett, a survivor of child abuse said.

Bramlett lived in a physically and sexually abusive family until she ran away at 17.

"There were people and teachers and people at churches that knew, they had to know, because we came with bruises and broken bones and unexplained injuries,  but I'm also almost  60 years old and so it was a different time back then," she said.

After writing a book on her traumatic upbringing and the power of forgiveness called Seven Silent Witnesses, she's toured the world to help folks understand what abuse looks like from the victims point of view.

"Most of the time it will be subtle little things that you can notice in their behaviors, inappropriate things they say, inappropriate ways of acting out, inappropriate ways of reacting or responding with another adult  or shying away or not wanting to go home  all those things are indicators," she said.

Whether or not a person works with children daily, Bramlett hopes all adults will watch out for these signs when dealing with kids.

"Take the time to listen, to watch, to get involved, to care, and to value other people. Just your valuing another person can save their life."

For more on Bramlett's story, visit her site here.

Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus

More Local News