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Arkansas Teen Injured in 'Fire Challenge' Warns Others of Dangers

HOT SPRINGS, AR--Arkansas doctors are warning parents to keep a close eye on challenges popping up online.
HOT SPRINGS, AR--Arkansas doctors are warning parents to keep a close eye on challenges popping up online. One of the latest, the fire challenge sent an Arkansas teenager to the burn center with serious injuries in July.

Instead of hopping from class to class at Hot Springs High, 14-year-old Monica Hamilton is getting used to 30-minute massages on the second degree burns covering 27 percent of her body.

This is what she has to show from taking on the fire challenge posted on Facebook.

"I saw a lot of people do it and I never saw anyone die from it," says Hamilton.

Against her mothers wishes, she poured nail polish remover down her stomach and sparked a lighter, landing in the burn center.

"I grabbed the shower curtain down jumped on top of her and smothered the fire out," says her mother.

"When we get word of this we want to let the community know, let kids know it's OK to stand up and say it's not right," says Amy Files, a registered nurse and Arkansas Childrens Hospital Outreach Coordinator.

Files says teenagers are most susceptible to this type of peer pressure.

"We find that social media does drive social rewards for these types of individuals so they focus on more this will get me more likes on Facebook and people will find this funny, what they don't realize the devastating effects.

Hamilton is the hospital's first case, now she's sharing her story in hopes of being the last.

"I don't want to see kids dying over things on Facebook," she says.

Files suggests parents monitor their kids online and find a way to steer them toward exciting and healthy activities such as hiking or zip-lining.

Parents can also report videos on YouTube or Facebook, encouraging dangerous behavior.
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