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Checks and Balances for Elected Officials

ROGERS, AR-- Rogers mayor, Greg Hines called a press conference Friday after a KNWA investigation uncovered questionable actions behind the closed doors of city hall.
ROGERS, AR-- Rogers mayor, Greg Hines called a press conference Friday after a KNWA investigation uncovered questionable actions behind the closed doors of city hall.

In our investigation, we uncovered accusations of drug abuse, including an investigation by police, city employees trading sex for services, bullying by a city employee that led to police getting involved, abuse of power and coercion among multiple city employees.

Read more on this story here.

We looked into what potential consequences could be for elected officials, and what it takes to remove an elected official from office.

According to the Arkansas Attorney General's Office, statute A.C.A 14-42-119 states:

A person who holds an elected office in a municipality for a term of four years in a mayor-council form of government is subject to removal from office by the electors qualified to vote.

Qualified voters are those registered within the city. They can file a petition with the city clerk.

Fayetteville city attorney, Kit Williams, says the process is not as easy as it may seem.

Williams said, "If they get 25% of the registered voters' signatures, which is difficult but not impossible, then there would be a question posed at that general election to which this applies, saying 'should this person be recalled?'"

Voters have the final say, according to the statute. If the majority of voters vote for the removal, that official will be removed from their position.

Williams said, "If there would be more than half of the term remaining, then there could be a special election. If there was less than half of the term, then the city council could appoint."

But if the majority vote against the removal, he or she would remain in office.



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