68°F
Sponsored by

EPA Seeks Criminal Charges Against Tyson for Fish Kill

MONETT, MO - Tyson Foods could face new charges stemming from an incident at the company's Monett plant. In May, the plant leaked a chemical into the city's water treatment facility. The chemical is believed to be linked to a large fish kill downstream.
Tyson plant in Monett
Tyson plant in Monett
MONETT, MO - Tyson Foods could face new charges stemming from an incident at the company's Monett plant. In May, the plant leaked a chemical into the city's water treatment facility. The chemical is believed to be linked to a large fish kill downstream.

There is already a civil lawsuit against the company from the Missouri Attorney General. Now, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is taking action. Tyson Foods is accused of causing the death of 100,000 fish after the leak that polluted Clear Creek. Civil charges have also been filed against the company.

In August, the company said the EPA is seeking, which became public in Tyson's August 7 SEC filing:

"If we become subject to criminal charges, we may be subject to a fine and other relief, as well as government contract suspension. We are cooperating with the Environmental Protection Agency but cannot predict the outcome of its investigation at this time. It is also possible that other regulatory agencies may commence investigations and allege additional violations."

KOLR in Springfield, Missouri contacted the EPA, which cannot comment on pending litigation, but sent this statement:

"The EPA works with law enforcement partners that share our commitment to protect natural resources and the communities that rely upon them to hold violators accountable." The City of Monett also fined Tyson for improperly releasing the chemical into its water treatment facility.

Tyson's SEC filings this quarter state the company is preparing for possible new violations from the city of Monett. However, KOLR spoke with the city's public works department Tuesday afternoon and there aren't any plans for more fines at this point.

Statement from EPA:

"Environmental violations that damage local waterways can have serious consequences for wildlife and public health. That's why EPA works with law enforcement partners that share our commitment to protect natural resources and the communities that rely upon them to hold violators accountable. Unfortunately, we are unable to provide information about ongoing investigations."
Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus

More Local News