50°F
Sponsored by

Exclusive Interview with LA Governor Bobby Jindal

FORT SMITH - Big names in American politics, from both sides of the aisle, continue pouring into Arkansas as all eyes turn to the state's heated race for U.S. Senate. The latest name...
"To me, that doesn't make any sense," said Jindal of Arkansas's decision to expand Medicaid. "You need more people pulling the cart than in the cart."
FORT SMITH - Big names in American politics, from both sides of the aisle, continue pouring into Arkansas as all eyes turn to the state's heated race for U.S. Senate. The latest name, Louisiana governor and possible 2016 Republican presidential candidate, Bobby Jindal who was in Fort Smith Monday night headlining a fundraiser for  fellow Republican Congressman Tom Cotton in his bid to unseat Democratic Senator Mark Pryor in the fall.

"I'm thrilled to be here to support him," said Jindal, who announced his endorsement of Cotton earlier in the day. "I've been with him at many events before. I'm thrilled to be here again. He's going to do a great job for us is in the Senate."

"We've got to make Harry Reid (D-NV) the minority leader. It's time to stop him from being the majority leader. We've got to stop all of these liberal judges from being appointed to the court."

While in the Natural State, Jindal, the country's first ever Indian American governor, weighed in on topics facing his neighbors to the north, including the private option,  Arkansas's version of Medicaid expansion.

"To me, that doesn't make any sense," said Jindal of Arkansas's decision to expand Medicaid. "You need more people pulling the cart than in the cart."

"For Louisiana, I think it would be a mistake to do Medicaid expansion, and that's why we're not doing it."

The private option has certainly been front and center in Arkansas over the last few months, but for the Bayou State, the growing point of contention there is that of Common Core -- an education initiative Jindal once supported. He now wants to get rid of it.

"I am for high standards for Louisiana's children, for the children in Arkansas and across our country," said Jindal when asked about  the change of heart. "What I'm not for is a one-size fits all federal overreach. The federal government never really was intended by our founding fathers to be involved in setting the curriculum -- the standards that are being taught in our local schools. That has never been a federal responsibility."

On the national scene, actions, as of late, by Louisiana's 55th governor, including the recent formation of his "Stand Up to Washington" PAC to assist conservative candidates in the 2014 midterm elections, has many believing the one-time congressman is gearing up for a run of his own in 2016.
   
"Obviously, it's something we would have to take very seriously, but only if we thought we had something to contribute," adds Jindal referring to a possible run for president and the decision he and his family must make. "My message to those folks in D.C., whether we run or not, is that folks in America are ready for a takeover of D.C. They are ready to reclaim their rights. They are tired of big government encroaching on their freedoms. They know that this isn't sustainable."

Jindal is one of several possible Republican candidates for president in 2016, but he says the number of challengers will not factor in to his decision to run.

You can watch the entire, uncut interview above.
Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus

More Local News