31°F
Sponsored by

Liquid Nicotine Poisoning In Kids Spikes In Arkansas

FAYETTEVILLE, AR. --- A recent study from the Center For Disease Control shows a surge in the number of liquid nicotine poisoning from e-cigarettes.
SILOAM SPRINGS, AR. --- A new report released on Thursday revealed that calls to poison control centers about e-cigarettes have gone up from about one call a month from September 2010 to 215 as of this February.

U.S. Senator Mark Pryor asked the FDA to take more action on this issue. Pryor said in part "With e-cigarettes now being sold in flavors like cherry and bubble gum, we've seen a staggering number of liquid nicotine poison cases in our state, especially in our young children. We must find a solution to this dangerous problem."

One store in Fayetteville is trying to keep liquid nicotine out of the reach of children.

The liquid nicotine that folks use in e-cigarettes is a small bottle. Although it's only about an ounce, it can be very harmful if put in the wrong hands.

With flavors that sound like you're ordering your favorite snow cone, it's easy to see why kids want a taste. However, this isn't a sweet treat.

It's liquid nicotine.

"We use glycol, vegetable glycerin. Basically one of those bottles is equivalent to a carton of cigarettes, so if you drank that it's not good. You don't want a lot of it in one shot," said Anthony Keith, manager at Next Vapor Spot in Fayetteville.

New numbers show kids are getting into these bottles. According to the CDC, poison control centers have received triple the numbers of calls about liquid nicotine poisoning.

To combat kids getting into these containers, Next Vapor spot in Fayetteville is adding another step for safety.

"It will be childproof caps on there so it will be a lot harder to get them off, kind of like medicine bottles, so you'll have to push down and squeeze and actually try to get the lid off instead of just being able to spin it off," said Keith.

Store manager Anthony Keith said the nicotine is just like anything else you wouldn't want your kids to get into.

"I bet they've got cleaning products in their house that they're not too worried about. Treat it like you would something that you don't want your kids drinking," said Keith.

So parents should take caution to keep the fun flavors, out of little one's hands.

Here is more information from the CDC and Pryor's statement.

Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus

More Local News