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Top Trenders: Colorado Troopers Train to Spot Stoned Drivers

Troopers are taking part in a nine day course on how to recognize drivers under the influence of marijuana.
Here are your Top Trenders for Wednesday, February 26th!

NUMBER 5 - FACEBOOK ENDS EMAIL SERVICE
After more than three years, Facebook's email service will be shutting down. The company announced that it will pull the plug on the little-used service. Emails showed up as messages for Facebook users, but it never really took off. Facebook says it plans to focus more on mobile messaging. If you used Facebook email, messages will be forwarded to your account's primary email address.

NUMBER 4 - SPOTTING STONED DRIVERS
Colorado is stepping up training for state troopers in order to spot stoned drivers. Troopers are taking part in a nine day course on how to recognize drivers under the influence of marijuana. The training is needed since stoned driving can be tougher to spot than drunken driving. Colorado troopers say 60 people were cited in January for pot-related driving offenses.

NUMBER 3 - STUDY LINKS ACETAMINOPHEN TO ADHD
Acetaminophen, most widely known as Tylenol, is routinely prescribed by doctors for pregnant women in pain, but a new study suggests that using it during pregnancy could be associated with ADHD in children. Using data from more than 64,000 children, researchers found that when a woman used the pain reliever for 20 weeks or more, their child had a 50 percent increased risk of receiving ADHD medicine later in life.

NUMBER 2 - AARON HERNANDEZ IN JAIL FIGHT
Former New England Patriots Tight End Aaron Hernandez was involved in a jailhouse fight with another inmate, and it could result in more charges. Hernandez is being held in Massachusetts while awaiting trial for the murder of Odin Lloyd. According to TMZ Sports, another inmate had been verbally harassing Hernandez all day Tuesday. If Hernandez is convicted of assault, the max penalty is two-and-a-half years in prison.

NUMBER 1 - GM EXPANDS RECALL
General Motors is expanding a recall on cars with a defect blamed for several deaths. Originally, the recall affected about 800,000 vehicles. Now, GM says it includes more than 1 million cars built between 2003 and 2007 and involves 13 deaths. The recall involves an ignition switch problem that can cause the key to move into the accessory, or off position. Saturn Ions, Chevrolet HHR's and the Pontiac Solstice and Sky models have been added to the list.

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