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Voters Could See Two Different Medical Marijuana Measures on November Ballots

AROUND ARKANSAS -- Two groups each have different medical marijuana measures that they are trying to get on the November ballot.
AROUND ARKANSAS -- Two groups. One mission: legalize medical marijuana.

Arkansans for Compassionate Care and Arkansans for Responsible Medicine, both pushing to pass a measure that failed after a joint effort two years ago.

But now, they're split, each with a different version and seeking support in different ways.

"It can be confusing," David Couch, counsel for Arkansans for Responsible Medicine, says.

To get it on the ballot, both groups need more than 60,000 signatures by July 7.

Arkansans for Compassionate Care put one of its strategies on display Tuesday night at Nightbirds Books in Fayetteville.

"Setting up new volunteers, getting signatures," Emma Yingling, sponsor for Arkansans for Compassionate Care, says.

On the other hand, Arkansans for Responsible Medicine isn't pounding the pavement, yet.

"We're not going to go out here and wear everybody out," Couch says.

Couch says it's more worried about raising money first and getting autographs later.

"...Hire a professional organization to come in here and canvass the people they can do it in 30-60 days," Couch says.

The groups also differ when it comes to regulating the drug, if it is legalized.

Emma Yingling, a sponsor with Arkansans for Compassionate Care says her group's measure seeks to allow hardship cultivation.

"...which is a very, very limited grow for patients that live very far away." Yingling says.

"They live far enough away from a dispensary, and maybe they're physically unable to get to a dispensary."

Couch says his group aims to set up more dispensaries, thus limiting hardship cultivation.

"Ours sets up 38 dispensaries across the state," Couch says.

Despite the differences, the level of confidence is the same.

"I think it'll pass," Yingling says.

"If I get mine on the ballot, it will pass." Couch says.

Both groups say whichever measure has more votes would trump the other, according to a constitutional amendment.
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