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'I Feel Safe' Students Respond to Bomb Threat at Fayetteville High School

It's business as usual at Fayetteville High School Tuesday, after a student found a threat on a girls' restroom stall Monday stating: "Ima bomb the school tomorrow."
It's business as usual at Fayetteville High School Tuesday, after a student found a threat on a girls restroom stall Monday stating: "Ima bomb the school tomorrow."

"Unfortunately this is a part of the culture now, you get these kind of threats and those type situations and you investigate them take everyone of them seriously, but we expect a normal day," Alan Wilbourn said, Public Information Officer for Fayetteville Public Schools.

An expectation students have too.

"I don't think it's a big deal because I don't think anyone who's making a bomb is going to write about it on the bathroom stall."

"I trust the security, and the teachers and the law enforcement around here,"

"My mom definitely said if I feel unsafe just come home, so that was good. But I feel safe,"

One thing Fayetteville Public Schools did differently when responding to this threat than to others is they used their emergency alert system.

They were able to get correct information out to parents and students before it went through the rumor mill on social media.

"It's rare that we use it for emergency situations but it's nice to have so that they get the message direct from us," Wilbourn said.

Wilbourn said FHS has received threats in the past, but did not inform parents, which caused some criticism. So this time they sent the alert.

"Now we knew it would cause some alarm with some, but I think the vast majority that we've heard from appreciated that we let them know," he said.

While it isn't clear when the threat was written, Fayetteville Police Department is increasing patrols on campus and reviewing surveillance video from outside the restroom in hopes of finding a suspect.

"The most strenuous thing that we can do as a school district is expel... and we've done that numerous times in these cases," Wilbourn said.

Criminally, this type of threat is considered "terroristic threatening."

It's a felony for adults and carries a punishment of up to 7 years in prison.

For minors the punishment is left up to the court system.

But as for these students, it's just another Tuesday at school.

"It happens in high school. I think people are looking for attention."

"I feel safe."


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