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Neck Decor With Ties to Northwest Arkansas

BROKEN ARROW, OKLAHOMA--Neck ties with Northwest Arkansas ties are getting national attention. If you've watched NBC's The Voice, you've probably seen the products. They're wooden bow ties worn by James Wolpert; a finalist on The Voice.
BROKEN ARROW, OKLAHOMA--Neck ties with Northwest Arkansas ties are getting national attention. If you've watched NBC's  'The Voice'  you've probably seen the products. They're wooden bow ties worn by James Wolpert; a finalist on The Voice. The ties were actually made by a company near Tulsa. But the co-owner of Two Guys Bow Ties," Tim Paslay, grew up in Fayetteville. It was last year when two locals decided to add a new spin to an old style.

"Late last year, we had the wild idea to just make wooden bow ties," says Paslay. That wild idea now has Paslay's bow ties and lapel flowers turning up on athletes, in the pages of Esquire and making appearances on the MTV Movie Awards. Most recently, on James Wolpert, a finalist on The Voice, sported a wooden lapel flower, bringing attention to the Broken Arrow business.

"It was neat." Paslay said. "He actually wore two of ours during last week's performances, and they looked sharp."
Paslay says creating the ties and pins fits his unique background of making off-the-wall stuff. "First thing we do is we take the hard woods. We have to cut out the blanks. Once we have our blanks, we run over here to the band saw and we trim them down to almost our finished size… about a quarter of an inch."
"And then once we have these blanks finished out, we've got to sand them. Early on, that was me sitting behind one of these bench sanders and just sanding almost till my fingers just sanded off."

Now, Paslay has a couple of drum sanders. "Kind of like Krispy Kreme on the conveyer belt." Paslay knows styles come and go, but he is noticing a trend that marries design with craftsmanship. "I feel like there's an Americana/craftsmanship/maker movement, specifically in fashion, but kind of just all over right now. A lot of people are placing a high priority on the heritage and craftsmanship and tradition of the skill sets that people use. People care a lot more about not only how their stuff is being made, but also, who made it." A trend he hopes continues. "When guys are looking for that perfect piece to finish off an outfit, we want them coming to us."

Click here to learn more about how the ties are made and how to get your hands on one. Thanks to KJRH, the NBC Affiliate in Tulsa for its contribution to this story.

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