Locals Exploring Options to Repeal Ordinance 119

Locals Exploring Options to Repeal Ordinance 119

FAYETTEVILLE, AR--Even with 10 hours of public discussion at Tuesday's city council meeting, some residents say they're still not satisfied with the anti-discrimination ordinance. Now, they're exploring all of their options and taking actions to repeal it.
FAYETTEVILLE, AR--Even with 10 hours of public discussion at Tuesday's city council meeting, some residents say they're still not satisfied with the anti-discrimination ordinance. Now, they're exploring all of their options and taking actions to repeal it.

"We think this is a bad law, it's a bad ordinance," said Duncan Campbell, a resident opposing Ordinance 119.

Tuesday, the city of Fayetteville adopted an anti-discrimination ordinance, designed to protect all races, genders & sexual orientations, but some residents don't like it.

"We think how it was done, you know on how, without a lot of community uh discussion," Campbell said.

He's worked with churches and local businesses in oppositon. Now, they're working to repeal it.
Their options include filing a lawsuit against the city or petitioning to take this to public vote.

"I believe that if the citizens uh, were, were informed of the issues and knew what was going on, they would vote this down," said Campbell.

City attorney Kit Williams says he expected repeals of the new code... and those folks have some work ahead of them.

"The opponents would need to draft a petition and we have provided and will provide copies of previous petitions so they can look at them and model theirs after the ones that have been uh acceptable," said Williams.

He says opponents need 4100 valid signatures to prompt a special election and he's working to be fair with anyone going that route.

"I will be happy to review the petition form to see if it looks like it's in proper form before it starts being passed around so that there won't be just some technical mistake," said Williams.

A special election would cost the city $25,000, but Campbell says it's a price the city will just have to pay.

"They did have a chance to let it go to the voters and they voted it down," said Williams. "I felt like there was no trust for the citizens of Fayetteville when they did that."

Fayetteville city attorney Kit Williams says people have until September 19 to turn in petitions.
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