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Trauma Comm System Saving Lives In Arkansas

LITTLE ROCK, AR- Arkansas ranks number one in the nation for the most trauma fatalities, but now a trauma system in place is working to shrink those numbers.
LITTLE ROCK, AR- Arkansas ranks number one in the nation for the most trauma fatalities, but now a trauma system in place is working to shrink those numbers.

It's called Trauma Comm and the system is the first of it's kind in the country. It's designed to get the right patients to the right place at the right time. What used to take patients six to eight hours to find the right hospital and doctor, Trauma Communications Center Program Director Jeff Tabor says the system cut that down to 7 minutes. It also helped the fatality rate drop four percent.

"I don't think any of us realized how many hospitals that were in the state to begin with and then to start pairing it down to see what is and what isn't available immediately," says Jeff Tabor, AR Trauma Comm Center Program Director.

Tabor says Arkansas didn't have an organized trauma system in place. Now, a trauma dashboard breaks down the state by seven regions with a list of hospitals and 15 trauma related categories. It's color coded to show you which hospitals have specialty doctors and if there's room.

"It allows us to multi-task in a much quicker fashion than having to look through databases and what not," says Tabor.

Green means the door is open, orange means services are never provided, and red shows the hospital normally provides services, but not today.

"It's a quick look at that for us to see once we get a call from a helicopter or a ground truck with this is who we are and this is who we've got, we look at that and get them to the closest most appropriate," says Tabor.

Baptist Health Flight Nurse, Jeremy Jackson says the work they do with Trauma Comm is saving lives.

"It gets the patient to the appropriate facility to get them the care that they need so that they're not sitting in an emergency room," says Jackson.

They're able to save resources, save patients money and save time at the hospital.

"Now with EMS bypassing hospitals where the patients may not be cared for it's getting them directly to the centers that can," says Tabor.

The program is working so well, Tabor says first responders from other states are calling wanting to know more about it.
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