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Pain When Going to the Bathroom

I was on call the other evening and working late in the office and happened to see several little girls (between the ages of 4-10) who all had the complaint...

I was on call the other evening and working late in the office and happened to see several little girls (between the ages of 4-10) who all had the complaint of “it stings when I pee-pee”, otherwise known as pain with urination or dysuria. Interestingly, one of the patients had only complained several times that day, while the other little girl had a long, yet intermittent history of pain with urination.  

Whenever you hear pain with urination most parents will think of a urinary tract infection (UTI) Urinary tract infections are fairly common in this age group (about 5% of pre-pubertal girls will get one), but even more common than a UTI, is vaginal irritation that causes pain with urination as the urethra  becomes inflamed.   

Little girls love bubble baths and all of those lovely scented soaps and potions for the bath. They also love to sit in the soapy water and play or wash their hair and rinse all of that shampoo into the bath tub as well. Because the female urethra is short it is easily irritated by the chemicals and then gets inflamed. The next thing you know your little girl is complaining of pain when she heads to the potty. 

If your daughter simply has some pain with urination and is otherwise well, no fever, no blood in the urine etc. and she has been guilty of taking frequent bubble baths, you might try stopping the bubbles and see if the pain goes away. In many cases of little girl with painful urination, simply stopping the baths solves the problem. If the pain is due to soap and bubbles, these little girls typically do not have accidents or night time awakening either. Pushing fluids also helps. 

I also recommend to older girls taking showers as this typically solves the problem as well. Girls love bubbles but it’s the boys who can tolerate bubble baths due to their different anatomy! 

If stopping bubbles doesn’t do the trick you will need to see your pediatrician to rule out an infection. Remember, this type of pain with urination is often intermittent and does NOT cause fever or blood in the urine. Any of those symptoms in a child is a call to your pediatrician to be seen. 

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About Sue Hubbard, M.D.

Dr. Sue Hubbard is an award winning pediatrician and medical editor for www.kidsdr.com.  She is a native of Washington, D.C. who travelled south to attend the University of Texas at Austin and never left.Read More