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Second Chances for Better Choices

ROGERS, AR-- A three day conference brings teachers from across the state together, allowing them to share new ideas of what works and what doesn't when giving instructions to ALE students.
ROGERS, AR-- A three day conference brings teachers from across the state together, allowing them to share new ideas of what works and what doesn't when giving instructions to ALE students.

"Our kids come to us a lot of times broken. You know they come to us with barriers that maybe you or I didn't even realize. And yet, despite those barriers, our kids have dreams," said Paul Griep, Archer Learning Center principal.

...and Arkansas teachers, are coming together to keep those dreams alive.

"Our teachers have to think outside the box, because if we do what has been done in high schools, we're going to get the same results," said conference presenter, Dane Grant.

He's an ALE teacher and has worked in alternative education for 13 years, and doesn't believe test scores are most important when classifying students.

"People graduate at their own pace. And with alternative learners, we can control that pace. And just having the opportunity to graduate--be it take two years, three years, four years, the importance is actually graduating and not scoring high on a test score," said Grant.

Paul Griep is a Springdale principal attending this week's workshop. Over 100 ALE students graduated from his school last year. He said it's important these students receive the same benefits as traditional students.

"Plus in our district, we've been blessed with a lot of technology. So you know even though we're considered an alternative school, we have the same cutting edge, you know--technology that the other schools do. So being able to personalize that instruction for our kids I think makes a difference," said Griep.
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