How being on the frontlines affects mental health

KNWA

Recently a New York City doctor who recovered from the coronavirus, died from self-inflicted injuries.

ROGERS, Ark. (KNWA/KFTA) — Chief Clinical Officer at Eason Counseling Christine Renuart-Rapa said frontline healthcare professionals aren’t immune to the mental health or physical effects of this pandemic.

Nurses and doctors are known for their strong personas, but Renuart-Rapa said a lot of them are hurting right now.

She said what they need is for someone to check-in on them, and ask the question — how are you really doing?

Being on the frontlines can be extremely lonely, especially not being able to see your loved ones.

Call them, facetime them, do a ZOOM meeting, [anything to] just to make a connection.

CHRISTINE RENUART-RAPA, CHIEF CLINICAL OFFICER, EASON COUNSELING

Renuart-Rapa said if you are feeling overwhelmed while on the job, do things like taking a lap in your department, or singing a song that you like while doing something as simple as washing your hands.

If you or someone you know is struggling with mental health or suicide, click here.

Copyright 2020 Nexstar Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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