Storms precede season’s first freeze across South

KNWA

Injuries, power outages, and even a tornado watch for the mid-Atlantic region

DeKalb County Sheriff’s deputies and DeKalb firefighters and paramedics respond to a car in the ditch on Route 23 just south of Gurler Road as snow and wind continue to make driving hazardous in DeKalb Thursday, Oct. 31, 2019. (Mark Busch/Daily Chronicle via AP)

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — Storms with heavy rain and strong winds raked across the central United States from the Gulf Coast to the Great Lakes on Thursday ahead of an arctic blast that forecasters said could bring near-record cold to the South.

Temperatures were predicted to drop as much as 30 degrees in a few hours, and forecasters said severe storms were possible from Alabama to New England.

Winds gusted above 30 mph, and trees were toppled in the western Carolinas and Tennessee, where news outlets reported at least five people were injured when trees hit vehicles. A tornado watch stretched from western Virginia to northern Pennsylvania.

At least 80,000 homes and businesses were in the dark because of intermittent power outages from Louisiana to West Virginia.

A freeze warning reached across more than a dozen states, from southwestern Texas into the South and Midwest. Overnight lows could dip into the upper 20s in parts of the Deep South, forecasters said.

A blanket of snow caused travel problems in Illinois, meanwhile, and as much as 3 inches of snow driven by 50 mph winds were predicted around the Great Lakes.

The storms provided another round of drought relief across the Southeast after weeks of dry weather endangered crops and increased fire risks. But a new federal report showed much of Alabama, Georgia and South Carolina are still too dry.

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