How To Watch the July 2, 2019 Total Solar Eclipse

Weather Talk

A Total Solar Eclipse is coming Tuesday July 2nd and here’s what you need to know and how to see it.

Did you get to see the Great American Total Solar Eclipse of August 21, 2017? If you missed it, here’s another opportunity to witness the amazing spectacle of totality during a total solar eclipse. For this eclipse, you’ll have to watch it on a live stream if you live in the United States, since the path of totality doesn’t even come close to the US or even North America.

If you want to see this total solar eclipse in person, you’ll need to travel nearly 4,000 miles to the Southern Hemisphere to witness totality in the southern Pacific Ocean and in the countries of Chile and Argentina.

The thin narrow path of totality will run through the countries of Chile and Argentina.

So… what do you need to know to view the eclipse from the states? First of all, totality from a total solar eclipse doesn’t last very long. The duration of totality over South America will average only 2 minutes and 30 seconds. You’ll have to be exactly in the path of totality to see the sun’s corona as the new moon fully covers the sun.

Even the huge capital city of Argentina, Buenos Aires just barely misses totality by just a few miles.

Thankfully, all of us will have a front row seat to this incredible celestial event as the path of totality crosses directly over the Astronomical Observatory Cerro Tololo at approximately 3:38 P.M. central daylight time (CDT).

Watch NWA Weather Authority live stream below.

Scott Roberts of Explore Scientific in Springdale is with the Exploratorium at the observatory and here’s a look at some of the equipment they have to capture the July 2, 2019 eclipse at an elevation of 7,000 feet above sea level.

Finally, for those that did make the trip to South America, here’s a look at the expected sky conditions and projected cloud cover for Tuesday afternoon.

We’ll have our chance to see totality in parts of the U.S. including Arkansas for the total solar eclipse on April 8, 2024 total. Mark your calendars NOW… you don’t want to miss it.

Path of totality for April 8, 2024 Total Solar Eclipse

You can watch the live stream coverage at https://www.exploratorium.edu/eclipse starting at 3 P.M. CDT Tuesday.

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